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A-#1 Fuckface Gingrich Absurdist Ramblings

Monday, May 18, 2009

By Lucas O'Connor
MyDD


Newt Gingrich went on ABC radio Friday and had a fucking conniption over Pelosi vs CIA. He flipped out to such a dramatically absurd degree, it still forces one to wonder what is actually going on here. For one, he jumped to the forefront of calling for robust Congressional investigations:
"I think she has lied to the House, and I think that the House has an absolute obligation to open an inquiry, and I hope there will be a resolution to investigate her. And I think this is a big deal. I don't think the Speaker of the House can lie to the country on national security matters," Gingrich said.
We'll get to that right after we catch up on 8 years of Bush administration investigations champ. Those were the eight years when Gingrich was not calling for investigations into who might have lied by the way. Last I checked, he's not a big booster of investigating what the Bush administration might have done, so one wonders why he's so concerned about Pelosi, since whatever happened is clearly in the past now. But then he kicked the absurdity to a level that I can only barely comprehend:
He continued: "I think this is the most despicable, dishonest and vicious political effort I've seen in my lifetime."

"She is a trivial politician, viciously using partisanship for the narrowist of purposes, and she dishonors the Congress by her behavior."
This is Newt. Gingrich. Suggesting that someone else is using the speakership for narrow, trivial and partisan purposes. To that I will submit my first "are you fucking serious?" Additionally, Newt Gingrich was born June 17, 1943. Which means that in his expert political opinion, no political effort of the past sixty six years approaches an invented controversy motivated by a desperate hope to cover up illegal torture. Not, say, anything Bush did or Iran-Contra or Watergate or the Gulf of Tonkin or the origins of the Cold War or segregation or Japanese internment or anything like that. The worst thing SUPERPLUSFOREVERANDEVERZOMG in Newt Gingrich's estimation is the dispute in which he has absolutely no knowledge of what actually happened or any credibility because he wasn't remotely involved in anything when it happened. So I ask a second time, "are you fucking serious?"...(Click for remainder.)

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Pirates!

By R.J. Matson
The New York Observer



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President Obama Address to Notre Dame



Thank you, Father Jenkins for that generous introduction. You are doing an outstanding job as president of this fine institution, and your continued and courageous commitment to honest, thoughtful dialogue is an inspiration to us all.

Good afternoon Father Hesburgh, Notre Dame trustees, faculty, family, friends, and the class of 2009. I am honored to be here today, and grateful to all of you for allowing me to be part of your graduation.

I want to thank you for this honorary degree. I know it has not been without controversy. I don’t know if you’re aware of this, but these honorary degrees are apparently pretty hard to come by. So far I’m only 1 for 2 as President. Father Hesburgh is 150 for 150. I guess that’s better. Father Ted, after the ceremony, maybe you can give me some pointers on how to boost my average.

I also want to congratulate the class of 2009 for all your accomplishments. And since this is Notre Dame, I mean both in the classroom and in the competitive arena. We all know about this university’s proud and storied football team, but I also hear that Notre Dame holds the largest outdoor 5-on-5 basketball tournament in the world - Bookstore Basketball.

Now this excites me. I want to congratulate the winners of this year’s tournament, a team by the name of “Hallelujah Holla Back.” Well done. Though I have to say, I am personally disappointed that the “Barack O’Ballers” didn’t pull it out. Next year, if you need a 6’2” forward with a decent jumper, you know where I live.

Every one of you should be proud of what you have achieved at this institution. One hundred and sixty three classes of Notre Dame graduates have sat where you are today. Some were here during years that simply rolled into the next without much notice or fanfare - periods of relative peace and prosperity that required little by way of sacrifice or struggle.

You, however, are not getting off that easy. Your class has come of age at a moment of great consequence for our nation and the world - a rare inflection point in history where the size and scope of the challenges before us require that we remake our world to renew its promise; that we align our deepest values and commitments to the demands of a new age. It is a privilege and a responsibility afforded to few generations - and a task that you are now called to fulfill.

This is the generation that must find a path back to prosperity and decide how we respond to a global economy that left millions behind even before this crisis hit - an economy where greed and short-term thinking were too often rewarded at the expense of fairness, and diligence, and an honest day’s work.

We must decide how to save God’s creation from a changing climate that threatens to destroy it. We must seek peace at a time when there are those who will stop at nothing to do us harm, and when weapons in the hands of a few can destroy the many. And we must find a way to reconcile our ever-shrinking world with its ever-growing diversity - diversity of thought, of culture, and of belief.

In short, we must find a way to live together as one human family.

It is this last challenge that I’d like to talk about today. For the major threats we face in the 21st century - whether it’s global recession or violent extremism; the spread of nuclear weapons or pandemic disease - do not discriminate. They do not recognize borders. They do not see color. They do not target specific ethnic groups.

Moreover, no one person, or religion, or nation can meet these challenges alone. Our very survival has never required greater cooperation and understanding among all people from all places than at this moment in history.

Unfortunately, finding that common ground - recognizing that our fates are tied up, as Dr. King said, in a “single garment of destiny” - is not easy. Part of the problem, of course, lies in the imperfections of man - our selfishness, our pride, our stubbornness, our acquisitiveness, our insecurities, our egos; all the cruelties large and small that those of us in the Christian tradition understand to be rooted in original sin. We too often seek advantage over others. We cling to outworn prejudice and fear those who are unfamiliar. Too many of us view life only through the lens of immediate self-interest and crass materialism; in which the world is necessarily a zero-sum game. The strong too often dominate the weak, and too many of those with wealth and with power find all manner of justification for their own privilege in the face of poverty and injustice. And so, for all our technology and scientific advances, we see around the globe violence and want and strife that would seem sadly familiar to those in ancient times.

We know these things; and hopefully one of the benefits of the wonderful education you have received is that you have had time to consider these wrongs in the world, and grown determined, each in your own way, to right them. And yet, one of the vexing things for those of us interested in promoting greater understanding and cooperation among people is the discovery that even bringing together persons of good will, men and women of principle and purpose, can be difficult.

The soldier and the lawyer may both love this country with equal passion, and yet reach very different conclusions on the specific steps needed to protect us from harm. The gay activist and the evangelical pastor may both deplore the ravages of HIV/AIDS, but find themselves unable to bridge the cultural divide that might unite their efforts. Those who speak out against stem cell research may be rooted in admirable conviction about the sacredness of life, but so are the parents of a child with juvenile diabetes who are convinced that their son’s or daughter’s hardships can be relieved.

The question, then, is how do we work through these conflicts? Is it possible for us to join hands in common effort? As citizens of a vibrant and varied democracy, how do we engage in vigorous debate? How does each of us remain firm in our principles, and fight for what we consider right, without demonizing those with just as strongly held convictions on the other side?

Nowhere do these questions come up more powerfully than on the issue of abortion.

As I considered the controversy surrounding my visit here, I was reminded of an encounter I had during my Senate campaign, one that I describe in a book I wrote called The Audacity of Hope. A few days after I won the Democratic nomination, I received an email from a doctor who told me that while he voted for me in the primary, he had a serious concern that might prevent him from voting for me in the general election. He described himself as a Christian who was strongly pro-life, but that’s not what was preventing him from voting for me.

What bothered the doctor was an entry that my campaign staff had posted on my website - an entry that said I would fight “right-wing ideologues who want to take away a woman’s right to choose.” The doctor said that he had assumed I was a reasonable person, but that if I truly believed that every pro-life individual was simply an ideologue who wanted to inflict suffering on women, then I was not very reasonable. He wrote, “I do not ask at this point that you oppose abortion, only that you speak about this issue in fair-minded words.”

Fair-minded words.

After I read the doctor’s letter, I wrote back to him and thanked him. I didn’t change my position, but I did tell my staff to change the words on my website. And I said a prayer that night that I might extend the same presumption of good faith to others that the doctor had extended to me. Because when we do that - when we open our hearts and our minds to those who may not think like we do or believe what we do - that’s when we discover at least the possibility of common ground.

That’s when we begin to say, “Maybe we won’t agree on abortion, but we can still agree that this is a heart-wrenching decision for any woman to make, with both moral and spiritual dimensions.

So let’s work together to reduce the number of women seeking abortions by reducing unintended pregnancies, and making adoption more available, and providing care and support for women who do carry their child to term. Let’s honor the conscience of those who disagree with abortion, and draft a sensible conscience clause, and make sure that all of our health care policies are grounded in clear ethics and sound science, as well as respect for the equality of women.”

Understand - I do not suggest that the debate surrounding abortion can or should go away. No matter how much we may want to fudge it - indeed, while we know that the views of most Americans on the subject are complex and even contradictory - the fact is that at some level, the views of the two camps are irreconcilable. Each side will continue to make its case to the public with passion and conviction. But surely we can do so without reducing those with differing views to caricature.

Open hearts. Open minds. Fair-minded words.

It’s a way of life that has always been the Notre Dame tradition. Father Hesburgh has long spoken of this institution as both a lighthouse and a crossroads. The lighthouse that stands apart, shining with the wisdom of the Catholic tradition, while the crossroads is where “…differences of culture and religion and conviction can co-exist with friendship, civility, hospitality, and especially love.” And I want to join him and Father Jenkins in saying how inspired I am by the maturity and responsibility with which this class has approached the debate surrounding today’s ceremony.

This tradition of cooperation and understanding is one that I learned in my own life many years ago - also with the help of the Catholic Church.

I was not raised in a particularly religious household, but my mother instilled in me a sense of service and empathy that eventually led me to become a community organizer after I graduated college. A group of Catholic churches in Chicago helped fund an organization known as the Developing Communities Project, and we worked to lift up South Side neighborhoods that had been devastated when the local steel plant closed.

It was quite an eclectic crew. Catholic and Protestant churches. Jewish and African-American organizers. Working-class black and white and Hispanic residents. All of us with different experiences. All of us with different beliefs. But all of us learned to work side by side because all of us saw in these neighborhoods other human beings who needed our help - to find jobs and improve schools. We were bound together in the service of others.

And something else happened during the time I spent in those neighborhoods. Perhaps because the church folks I worked with were so welcoming and understanding; perhaps because they invited me to their services and sang with me from their hymnals; perhaps because I witnessed all of the good works their faith inspired them to perform, I found myself drawn - not just to work with the church, but to be in the church. It was through this service that I was brought to Christ.

At the time, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin was the Archbishop of Chicago. For those of you too young to have known him, he was a kind and good and wise man. A saintly man. I can still remember him speaking at one of the first organizing meetings I attended on the South Side. He stood as both a lighthouse and a crossroads - unafraid to speak his mind on moral issues ranging from poverty, AIDS, and abortion to the death penalty and nuclear war. And yet, he was congenial and gentle in his persuasion, always trying to bring people together; always trying to find common ground. Just before he died, a reporter asked Cardinal Bernardin about this approach to his ministry. And he said, “You can’t really get on with preaching the Gospel until you’ve touched minds and hearts.”

My heart and mind were touched by the words and deeds of the men and women I worked alongside with in Chicago. And I’d like to think that we touched the hearts and minds of the neighborhood families whose lives we helped change. For this, I believe, is our highest calling.

You are about to enter the next phase of your life at a time of great uncertainty. You will be called upon to help restore a free market that is also fair to all who are willing to work; to seek new sources of energy that can save our planet; to give future generations the same chance that you had to receive an extraordinary education. And whether as a person drawn to public service, or someone who simply insists on being an active citizen, you will be exposed to more opinions and ideas broadcast through more means of communications than have ever existed before. You will hear talking heads scream on cable, read blogs that claim definitive knowledge, and watch politicians pretend to know what they’re talking about. Occasionally, you may also have the great fortune of seeing important issues debated by well-intentioned, brilliant minds. In fact, I suspect that many of you will be among those bright stars.

In this world of competing claims about what is right and what is true, have confidence in the values with which you’ve been raised and educated. Be unafraid to speak your mind when those values are at stake. Hold firm to your faith and allow it to guide you on your journey. Stand as a lighthouse.

But remember too that the ultimate irony of faith is that it necessarily admits doubt. It is the belief in things not seen. It is beyond our capacity as human beings to know with certainty what God has planned for us or what He asks of us, and those of us who believe must trust that His wisdom is greater than our own.

This doubt should not push us away from our faith. But it should humble us. It should temper our passions, and cause us to be wary of self-righteousness. It should compel us to remain open, and curious, and eager to continue the moral and spiritual debate that began for so many of you within the walls of Notre Dame. And within our vast democracy, this doubt should remind us to persuade through reason, through an appeal whenever we can to universal rather than parochial principles, and most of all through an abiding example of good works, charity, kindness, and service that moves hearts and minds.

For if there is one law that we can be most certain of, it is the law that binds people of all faiths and no faith together. It is no coincidence that it exists in Christianity and Judaism; in Islam and Hinduism; in Buddhism and humanism. It is, of course, the Golden Rule - the call to treat one another as we wish to be treated. The call to love. To serve. To do what we can to make a difference in the lives of those with whom we share the same brief moment on this Earth.

So many of you at Notre Dame - by the last count, upwards of 80% — have lived this law of love through the service you’ve performed at schools and hospitals; international relief agencies and local charities. That is incredibly impressive, and a powerful testament to this institution. Now you must carry the tradition forward. Make it a way of life. Because when you serve, it doesn’t just improve your community, it makes you a part of your community. It breaks down walls. It fosters cooperation. And when that happens - when people set aside their differences to work in common effort toward a common good; when they struggle together, and sacrifice together, and learn from one another - all things are possible.

After all, I stand here today, as President and as an African-American, on the 55th anniversary of the day that the Supreme Court handed down the decision in Brown v. the Board of Education. Brown was of course the first major step in dismantling the “separate but equal” doctrine, but it would take a number of years and a nationwide movement to fully realize the dream of civil rights for all of God’s children. There were freedom rides and lunch counters and Billy clubs, and there was also a Civil Rights Commission appointed by President Eisenhower. It was the twelve resolutions recommended by this commission that would ultimately become law in the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

There were six members of the commission. It included five whites and one African-American; Democrats and Republicans; two Southern governors, the dean of a Southern law school, a Midwestern university president, and your own Father Ted Hesburgh, President of Notre Dame. They worked for two years, and at times, President Eisenhower had to intervene personally since no hotel or restaurant in the South would serve the black and white members of the commission together. Finally, when they reached an impasse in Louisiana, Father Ted flew them all to Notre Dame’s retreat in Land O’Lakes, Wisconsin, where they eventually overcame their differences and hammered out a final deal.

Years later, President Eisenhower asked Father Ted how on Earth he was able to broker an agreement between men of such different backgrounds and beliefs. And Father Ted simply said that during their first dinner in Wisconsin, they discovered that they were all fishermen. And so he quickly readied a boat for a twilight trip out on the lake. They fished, and they talked, and they changed the course of history.

I will not pretend that the challenges we face will be easy, or that the answers will come quickly, or that all our differences and divisions will fade happily away. Life is not that simple. It never has been.

But as you leave here today, remember the lessons of Cardinal Bernardin, of Father Hesburgh, of movements for change both large and small. Remember that each of us, endowed with the dignity possessed by all children of God, has the grace to recognize ourselves in one another; to understand that we all seek the same love of family and the same fulfillment of a life well-lived. Remember that in the end, we are all fishermen.

If nothing else, that knowledge should give us faith that through our collective labor, and God’s providence, and our willingness to shoulder each other’s burdens, America will continue on its precious journey towards that more perfect union. Congratulations on your graduation, may God Bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.

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Rumsfeld Sent Bush Creepy Top Secret Religious Updates About the Iraq War

By John Aravosis
AMERICAblog




Frank Rich reported on this last night. GQ has copies of the documents (I show two of them above, GQ has lots more). I'm a Christian. This is creepy. They look like "end of days" propaganda created by a cult or the Unibomber.



(Click for remainder.)

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And He Shall Be Judged

Former defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld has always answered his detractors by claiming that history will one day judge him kindly. But as he waits for that day, a new group of critics—his administration peers—are suddenly speaking out for the first time. What they’re saying? It isn’t pretty.

By Robert Draper
GQ


On the morning of Thursday, April 10, 2003, Donald Rumsfeld’s Pentagon prepared a top-secret briefing for George W. Bush. This document, known as the Worldwide Intelligence Update, was a daily digest of critical military intelligence so classified that it circulated among only a handful of Pentagon leaders and the president; Rumsfeld himself often delivered it, by hand, to the White House. The briefing’s cover sheet generally featured triumphant, color images from the previous days’ war efforts: On this particular morning, it showed the statue of Saddam Hussein being pulled down in Firdos Square, a grateful Iraqi child kissing an American soldier, and jubilant crowds thronging the streets of newly liberated Baghdad. And above these images, and just below the headline secretary of defense, was a quote that may have raised some eyebrows. It came from the Bible, from the book of Psalms: “Behold, the eye of the Lord is on those who fear Him…To deliver their soul from death.”

This mixing of Crusades-like messaging with war imagery, which until now has not been revealed, had become routine. On March 31, a U.S. tank roared through the desert beneath a quote from Ephesians: “Therefore put on the full armor of God, so that when the day of evil comes, you may be able to stand your ground, and after you have done everything, to stand.” On April 7, Saddam Hussein struck a dictatorial pose, under this passage from the First Epistle of Peter: “It is God’s will that by doing good you should silence the ignorant talk of foolish men.” (To see these and more Bush-administration intelligence cover sheets, visit GQ.com’s exclusive slideshow)....(Click for remainder.)

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On Faux News, Notre Dame Professor Williams Blast Randall Terry

By Media Matters

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Sean Hannity “Palling Around” With Anti-Abortion Extremist (Domestic Terrorist?) Randall Terry?

By Pricilla
News Hounds


Bill Ayers, a former member of the Weather Underground and professor at the University of Chicago, was never convicted of any violence and his association with Barack Obama was tangential. But that didn't stop Sean Hannity from promoting the Republican base meme that Barack Obama "palled around with "terrorist" Bill Ayers. Randall Terry, however, has been convicted on a number of occasions as a result of his attempts to interfere with the operation of women's clinics and the women who access them. His tactics and rhetoric are similar to those used by white supremacist groups. He settled out of court with NOW as a result of damages that his followers inflicted on these clinics. He was recently arrested for violating a no trespassing order issued by the University of Notre Dame as part of his ongoing campaign to make abortion illegal. And during his halcyon days of anti abortion thuggery he was very close to James Kopp who was sentenced to life imprisonment for killing a doctor who performed abortions. But these unsavory facts don't seem to be a problem for Sean Hannity who allowed Terry, during the Terri Schiavo "circus" that Terry organized, a platform from which to spout his rhetoric. Terry has promised that the Notre Dame graduation will be turned into another "circus" and Sean Hannity gave him yet another platform on Friday night's "Hannity" show.

Update From Notre Dame - Randall Terry, in speaking by phone with Fox's Chris Wallace, said he's very disappointed at the low protest turnout. Few students have the pro-life emblem on their mortarboards. Obama received a resounding applause when he entered the hall and when he received the honorary degree. Wallace said that there has been a overwhelmingly positive response to Obama.

The show opened with a video which spliced segments of Angels and Demons together to make it look like Barack Obama was threatening the Catholic Church. Hannity said that the upcoming Notre Dame graduation is like a "blockbuster" film and the Catholic Church is protesting Obama's upcoming speech and honorary degree. (Whoa, Stop Right There – this is not an organized protest by the Catholic Church; but a protest organized by the conservative Catholic Newman Society and Randall Terry which has been expanded to other "pro-life" groups. 70 out of about 300 Catholic bishops have spoken out as have some priests. The Vatican has NOT taken a stand.) Hannity cited the petition signed by anti-Obama protesters while not mentioning the various petitions in support of Obama's appearance. He described his guest, Randall Terry, as being in "the forefront of the debate." He mentioned that Terry was the first person to be arrested for protesting the speech. (And violating a no trespassing order issued from the school). Terry had to explain that the original guest (Alan Keyes) was in jail. Eluding the "no trespassing" thingie, Terry said that the arrest of Keyes, while holding a banner of Mary and praying the Rosary, was a betrayal of the Catholic Faith as Keyes was defending Mary. (Again, Randall, what part of no trespassing don't you get?) Terry blithered that human life was being "snuffed out" because of President Obama. Hannity claimed that Obama's position on abortion was radical and "we debated the issue of infanticide" (yeah, with anti abortion wingnut Jill Stanek whose claims have been discredited by the Illinois attorney general). Hannity played the tape of the 78 year old priest being arrested. To the question of ramification of this, Terry predicted that ND President will lose his job. He also complained that the Catholic bishops weren't willing to be "martyrs" and asserted that the local bishop should have used his power to prevent the arrests. Hannity wanted to know why ND did this as Obama's views are the antithesis of the Catholic faith. (Catholic Hannity obviously doesn't know that his church's views on social justice, treatment of immigrants and minorities are in tandem with Obama's). Terry lapsed into a strange analogy of the situation and blithered about the "treachery" of Catholic universities who don't take a strong stand against "child killing." Hannity repeated the claim about antithetical views and agreed with Terry about the analogy of Pope Benedict speaking before Planned Parenthood. Terry finished off the program with an even more bizarre analogy: "Can you imagine somebody saying, 'Let's have one of the leaders of Germany come in -- we don't really like what he did with that Jewish thing, but they build great roads, and they gave people hope, and they helped rebuild the economy.' It's crazy."...(Click for remainder.)

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UCLA Study Assesses Economic Impact of Gay Marriage

By Charles Lemos
MyDD


Poor Michael Steele just can't catch a break. A day after declaring that gay marriage was bad for the economy, the Boston Globe publishes the findings of a UCLA study (pdf.) on the economic impact of gay marriage in California based on projections from the impact heretofore in Massachusetts. The UCLA study found that the over 12,000 same-sex marriages performed in Massachusetts since 2004 have pumped over $111 million into the state's economy.
The report from the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law says a typical same-sex couple spent about $7,400 on their wedding, with one in ten couples spending over $20,000.

A second study by the same group found that young, highly educated people in same-sex relationships were 2.5 times more likely to move to Massachusetts after 2004 than before gay marriage became legal.
The UCLA study by Professors Brad Sears and M.V. Badgett of the Williams Institute also found that spending "by resident same-sex couples on their weddings, and by out-of-state couples on tourism and their weddings, will boost California's economy by over $683.6 million in direct spending over the next three years." Furthermore, the direct spending by resident and out-of-state same-sex couples is enough to create and sustain over 2,178 new jobs in California. And their conservative estimate is that gay marriage will generate over $55.1 million in state and local sales tax revenues and transient occupancy tax revenues.

Still I hope it will yet dawn on Michael Steele that gay marriage isn't about any economic impact but about the pursuit of happiness....(Click for original.)

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Nancy Pelosi and Waterboarding

By Jerry Holbert
The Boston Herald



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Jews: No Jesus, No Reason, Just Whining; They’re Motivated by Anger and Boohoo Victimhood

By Hemant Mehta
Friendly Athiest


Here's why I can't stand Jews.
  • They're boring.
  • They keep complaining about being oppressed.
  • They keep talking about the same damn things all the time — Holocaust this and Israel that.
  • They always claim they're victims.
  • They only constitute a small percentage of Americans — probably because they can't win over any converts.
  • They still complain about how state Constitutions bar them from holding office — really, only six of them do — even though the Supreme Court has said those provisions are unenforceable.
  • They want affirmative action for their kind — one representative from the "pity-poor-me" school of Jews even said they need "safe spaces" at colleges!
  • They assume everyone who doesn't agree with them is "beyond stupid."
  • They never want to take on the serious arguments that theologians have made in favor of the Christian god.
  • Some Jews think Jesus never even existed. So what do they know?
  • They're not rational. They're just angry. Angry because they think the world is unfair to them. Angry that someone forced them to go to church as a child. Some Jews are so angry, they sued the government to prevent a Christian prayer from being spoken at President Obama's inauguration. The gall!
Now… if I actually believed that, I'd be called every name in the book. And rightfully so. Those are ignorant, bigoted, hateful remarks. They're also wildly stereotypical and extremely inaccurate.

When Charlotte Allen says the exact same things about atheists, however, she gets published in the Los Angeles Times.

I've been staring at this article for a while… partly wondering what was going through Allen's head, and partly wondering why the LA Times would publish such garbage....(Click for remainder.)

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The NRA and Gun-Freaks Want Guns in National Parks

By John Sherffius
Boulder Daily Camera



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Obama Can't Turn the Page on Bush

By Frank Rich
The New York Times


To paraphrase Al Pacino in “Godfather III,” just when we thought we were out, the Bush mob keeps pulling us back in. And will keep doing so. No matter how hard President Obama tries to turn the page on the previous administration, he can’t. Until there is true transparency and true accountability, revelations of that unresolved eight-year nightmare will keep raining down drip by drip, disrupting the new administration’s high ambitions.

That’s why the president’s flip-flop on the release of detainee abuse photos — whatever his motivation — is a fool’s errand. The pictures will eventually emerge anyway, either because of leaks (if they haven’t started already) or because the federal appeals court decision upholding their release remains in force. And here’s a bet: These images will not prove the most shocking evidence of Bush administration sins still to come.

There are many dots yet to be connected, and not just on torture. This Sunday, GQ magazine is posting on its Web site an article adding new details to the ample dossier on how Donald Rumsfeld’s corrupt and incompetent Defense Department cost American lives and compromised national security. The piece is not the work of a partisan but the Texan journalist Robert Draper, author of “Dead Certain,” the 2007 Bush biography that had the blessing (and cooperation) of the former president and his top brass. It draws on interviews with more than a dozen high-level Bush loyalists.

Draper reports that Rumsfeld’s monomaniacal determination to protect his Pentagon turf led him to hobble and antagonize America’s most willing allies in Iraq, Britain and Australia, and even to undermine his own soldiers. But Draper’s biggest find is a collection of daily cover sheets that Rumsfeld approved for the Secretary of Defense Worldwide Intelligence Update, a highly classified digest prepared for a tiny audience, including the president, and often delivered by hand to the White House by the defense secretary himself. These cover sheets greeted Bush each day with triumphal color photos of the war headlined by biblical quotations. GQ is posting 11 of them, and they are seriously creepy....(Click for remainder.)

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